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Household Items Young People Can Get High From

By |March 3rd, 2019|Categories: Addiction|0 Comments

Parents always want the best for their children. They want them to be successful, healthy, and happy. One of the greatest threats to a young person’s wellbeing, and one of the greatest concerns of parents, is that of substance abuse and drug addiction. There is no faster way for a young life to be ruined than through drug addiction. Parents worry about their kids getting involved with illegal street drugs, and for good reason. However, a lot of parents do not realize that their kids could be getting high off of household items in their own home. Parents need to be aware of what these are so they can take precautions to prevent their kids from abusing them.

It’s true that the abuse of household items as experimental drugs has actually decreased somewhat over the years. It’s largely because drugs are so relatively easy to get ahold of nowadays. Kids just tend to go to the streets or to other kids to trade money primarily for marijuana or pharmaceuticals, the biggest gateway drugs.

With that said, young people still are experimenting with abusing household items to get high, which can lead them down a dangerous path of more substance abuse. This is especially true for adolescents and teens between 12 and 18. They still usually live at home, and aren’t as likely to have already used hard drugs or alcohol as older people. It’s easy for one of these kids to just go on Google and find ways to get high from huffing glue or paint or compressed air products, or how to do whippets.

Parents owe it to their kids to be informed about how kids are abusing household items so they can prevent it from happening in the first place. Our homes should be the first line of defense against substance abuse among young people, not the environment that supplies the drugs they abuse.

Five Household Items that Kids Get High From

Here are 5 fairly common and innocuous seeming household items that kids are using to get high off of.

  • Cough syrup is in almost every household. If it doesn’t, it’s easy for a kid to just pick some up from a pharmacy. Taking large amounts of cough syrup at a time can cause a mind altering, hallucinogenic, or euphoric effect. It can also be addictive. It is possible to overdose on it, as it can slow heartrate and breathing and can cause death.
  • Inhalants or certain types of aerosol sprays can be used to get high. These include Freon, hairspray, cleaners, whipped cream canisters, mothballs, glues, paint thinners, and certain paints. The fumes from the items can be used to create a mind-altering effect.
  • Consuming too much nutmeg can actually cause a person to get high. Way too much nutmeg can poison a person, causing heart palpitations and nausea.
  • There is a very strange new trend of teens soaking tampons in alcohol and then inserting them into their vagina or rectum in order to supposedly get drunk. There’s no proof that it actually works, however, it can potentially cause alcohol poisoning.
  • Over the counter motion sickness pills can cause hallucinations when taken in high quantities. Taking too much can actually cause overdose and potentially death.

There are many more household items a kid can get high off of, but these are some of the most common to watch out for. Parents need to make sure that if any of these are in the house, that they are locked up or not accessible to their kids. They also need to take the time to talk to their kids about the dangers of drugs and alcohol early and often throughout their adolescence and teen years. Studies show that kids whose parents talk to them about drugs are 400% less likely to abuse them. Still, only about a third of parents ever have that talk.

Sources:

https://www.webmd.com/parenting/ss/slideshow-crazy-things-teens-use-to-get-high

https://www.ranker.com/list/the-9-weirdest-ways-kids-are-getting-high-lately/jf-sargent

https://www.everydayhealth.com/kids-health-pictures/teenagers-abuse-household-items-as-drugs.aspx

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